Friday, February 6, 2009

US Cover Proof for ECHO!




Well, the art department chose a different background color than the one I'd suggested--but they did a wonderful job with the caltrop! And over all, I think it's quite striking, and in keeping with the rest of the series.

Whattayathink?

215 comments:

  1. It's quite striking! Almost has a menacing appearance, but it certainly draws you in - is this intentionally foreshadowing the mood of the book, maybe?

    I just got an surge of excitement - now I have to go do something around the house to work it off, haha!

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  2. I just thought of something - for someone who doesn't know what a caltrop is, or that it is supposed to be a caltrop...does that kind of look like a chicken foot?

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  3. I do really like the center image of the caltrop and the intwined circle behind. That is indeed striking and very evocative of the kind of journey I suspect Echo will take us on. I had, however, grown quite attached to that rich blue color used on the UK cover proof but I'm sure once I have the book in my hands, I won't care at all what color the cover is. Thank you for sharing it with us all!

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  4. Ooooooooooh! Aaaaaaaaaaaah!

    I absolutely love it! A black diamond. I think the caltrop stands out well against the background. It has a sinister feel to it.

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  5. What an awesome cover!! They did a great job with it.

    If I had to choose one thing, it would be "bestselling author of The Outlander Series" would be better than ABOSAH, but really, that's so minor when it's all said and done.

    Wonderful :) And thanks for sharing!

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  6. Dear Nathalie and Tess--

    Menacing and sinister are good. [g]

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  7. Me Likey!! It's dark and mysterious!

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  8. And now for another adjective that will likely make you happy...now that I've seen the cover art...I'm scairt!

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  9. OK, I'm with Natalie. Since I knew it was a caltrop I did not see the chicken foot until she said something. But for the uninformed I fear a chicken foot it may be.

    When the kid gets home from school I will ask him.

    Leslie

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  10. I like the look of the cover. The colour is great as is the celtic intertwined circle, however, the caltrop is a bit confusing. Would it be better to show it at a slight side angle? It looks a bit awkward to me, but go with what you like, since you'll never please everyone. As someone else intimated, once the book is out it won't be closed anyway!

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  11. Whoa. Striking indeed. "Menacing and sinister are good"?!!?!?? Considering the book is set during the Revolution, that's par for the course during a war.

    However, the caltrop does rather resemble a chicken foot. That wasn't the first thing I thought when I saw it, but the resemblence is there.

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  12. Are you guys clicking on the book cover proof to enlarge the photo? The 4 spikes are much better seen when enlarged, & there is no 'chicken foot' resemblance. I think it will look very good live & full size.

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  13. I love it! The caltrop is just perfect. And no, it's NOT a chicken foot, people; take a closer look at the wickedly sharp points on the spikes! This is most definitely a weapon.

    It's classy and elegant, and I like the way they incorporated the Celtic design into it.

    Excellent job. I really couldn't have asked for more.

    You know I'm normally a very patient person <g>, but not right now. This picture is making me crazy with anticipation. Suddenly the book is real, tangible, in a way it hasn't been for me up till now. I CAN'T WAIT!!

    Karen

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  14. It's beautiful, but it'll look far better in my hands.

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  15. I knew it was a caltrop, and yet my first thought was "chicken foot". After I enlarged it, my thought was "giant chicken foot".[sigh] The rest of it is gorgeous, though.

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  16. I think it looks lovely, but I have to say I'm far more interested in what's going to be inside the cover. :-P

    ~Lisa

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  17. I love it! I think it goes well with the theme of the others. I'm getting so excited to read it!

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  18. It does send off the vibe of being dark and menacing.

    I am SO excited.

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  19. The Black is awesome! My first reaction was ohhhhhh, I like it! Now I know what a caltrop looks like, very menacing!

    LisaW

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  20. I love this! But I have to echo the earlier comment, it will look better in my hand. Do you have a release date yet? I've just started Drums of Autumn and I'm trying to read them slow so when I get to the end of "Breath" (it's the 4th time I've read the series) I should be able to fall right into "Echo".

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  21. Wow - I wouldn't want to step on that thing! Black is very ominous since it represents to me the color of mourning and loss . . .

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  22. Love it! I can't wait for the book to come out!

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  23. It's very striking, I like it very much!

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  24. When I tried to imagine what the caltrop design would look like, I didn't expect it to be drawn as if looking straight down on it, so that was a surprise. (I'm wondering if anyone will realize they _are_ looking at caltrop. (g))But that said, it's a striking and beautiful cover, and I like the dark background. It's going to stand out.

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  25. It's very striking. But I think the UK covers are much prettier than the US ones. Why are they different?

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  26. That is gorgeous! Is that purple? I think that's my favorite one so far.

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  27. wow this is fantastic. i love the look of it. one step closer! thanks for sharing.

    janie

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  28. Excellent! I recognized the caltrop immediately (but then again, I've seen caltrops made before).

    Really looking forward to the book!

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  29. Odd, my first thought was not "chicken foot," but "peace symbol".

    Was that intentional?

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  30. i have no idea what a caltrop is, certainly never saw one before. when i first saw it, it looked like a peace sign. is this meant to have multiple meanings to it or something?

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  31. Now every time I pick up this book I am going to think "chicken foot" I like the UK colour better, but over all very nice.

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  32. Yes, yes, yes. Perfect. Perfect. Just exactly what it's supposed to look like!

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  33. Hi Diana, I'm a big fan of your writing. I really love Jamie and Claire's adventures. I'm almost done Drums of Autumn.

    I can't wait to get to Echo soon. This is a pretty cover by the way --- looks dark and foreboding.

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  34. Love the background color, love the typeface, love the contrast of colors. Black does make it seem more weighty, more serious in tone. Also, something about the words "echo" and "bone" seem weighty in and of themselves... the way they sound when you say them out loud. It gave me the impression that maybe not only are Jamie and Claire, et. al. moving into new perils with the continuing war, but that possibly past troubles would be revisited on them as well. [insert foreboding music here]

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  35. I love it! I also love the celtic circle...just beautiful.

    Saundra

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  36. I think its awesome, and I am even more more MORE ready to READ it lol. xoxo melzie

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  37. i think it is gorgeous! anxiously awaiting teh release of the actual book... :D

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  38. The cover turned out perfect. I am a little nervous being that "menacing and sinister are good". Please dont let anything too bad happen to J and C.

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  39. Hi! I'm a newbie to you and your books. I started reading them in April of 2008. Though I've read them through twice, I don't feel too wet-behind-the-ears in regards to the story, but as to proper form in forums...yes, also being a newbie to chats and blogging. So, if I make any faux pas, please, please correct me, that includes everyone. Better to invite then to incite!

    I've been enjoying reading everyone's comments and opinions, here and on Compuserve. The interaction is playful and serious, which is sublime. That said, on to the fun stuff, like this cover.

    It's Elegant!

    It reminds me of the Anarchist Flag - the symbol the caltrop and circle form; in addition to the black backdrop being traditional for anarchy flags. How apropos since the story is now set in one of the most (if not THE most) famous rebellion in history; AND considering said rebellion leads to a remarkable "order". (Google listing is "Anarchist Flag".)

    Or, alternately it abstractly reminds me of the Highland Regiment's insignia. Thus, your desire for the blue backdrop? (I know a bit farfetched...but ya never know...!)

    And/or, it's just (she says just!) eluding to death and a tragic time, which is the basic symbolism of black in our culture. I'm sure this doesn't bode well for your characters. (More than usual I mean.)

    Well_there_I_finally_jumped - into your perfect pool of recommended-and-shared pondering.

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  40. And, maybe this posting should go somewhere else, perhaps Compuserve is the correct arena. I've been a "watcher" there for about a week and haven't worked out the sign-up process yet.

    So, here goes... (Very mushy, but true.)

    Diana,
    You have become such a tremendous inspiration for me. Your pure, wise and generous heart and soul are so incredibly shared in your books - absolutely breathtaking! Because of this you have profoundly reached my heart with all of your words, with all of your lessons...with your wisdom. I will always be in your debt.

    I thank you, AND I thank God for having made you!

    Best always,
    Kristina

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  41. Dear Amanda--

    Well, first off, I have different publishers in the UK and the US. Beyond that, marketing people always have different notions of what will sell effectively in their market, so even if it's the same publishing company, the cover designs will often be different between countries.

    (That said, the Germans have just done a new reissue of the series, using the American jewel-tone/icon covers--though substituting the black background/gold rings pattern for BREATH.)

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  42. Dear Headtrip and Rachel--

    It might. [g] A friend who just saw it suggested that it's sort of adapting the pattern of a Celtic brooch as a weapon of war, which I thought was cool imagery.

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  43. Dear Kristina--

    Welcome aboard! [g] The essence of a good story is Conflict, after all.

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  44. Dear Kristina--

    Awww. [blush] Thank you!

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  45. Dear Diana --
    Your sooo welcome!

    Oh, yes, Conflict...I can't imagine Jamie, Clarie and the gang without it, really. What would that be, a ____ I don't even know what it would be called, but it wouldn't be nice, I know that. [g]

    You are so gifted in your ability to be ruthless in regards to "where" you take your characters, without it ever feeling gratuitous. Thereby, the heights of joy are climber ever higher.

    I think you are a Master artisan when it comes to Conflict!

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  46. OMG how exciting!! I just turned my iBook around and showed my partner, who knows just how much I love the books. He think it looks good. I think it looks great! I agree, it's very striking and it fits in very well with the rest of the series. The caltrop stands out very well against the background, so it's a good choice for the team.

    I am just so excited!!! :)

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  47. Hi Diana,
    For the first time ever I actually prefer the US cover to the equivalent UK one. That design is striking and powerful. Kudos to the design team.

    With regards to the chicken foot resemblance, I think you could solve that by changing the colour of the caltrop. Chicken feet are yellow which is why the similarity is so problematic here. If the caltrop was a different colour I don't think "chicken foot" would occur to most people.

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  48. Dear Diana
    I don't know why but the first impression that have had looking at the cover is that the history is returning to the origins... Jamie, Claire and again.... the Scotland!!

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  49. Dear Apteryx --

    I agree with your idea of possibly changing the color of the caltrop. That sounds like a good fix...silver for instances shouldn't evoke the image of a chicken's foot, I'd think.

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  50. I Love It - I see and feel lots of energy and they will fly off the shelf. Congratulations

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  51. It could have nothing but the title and author name in boring block letters and it would still fly off the shelves. This looks really fantastic, though. Very striking, and much more "real". I simply can't wait!

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  52. Love it. Intriguing and all that - just what it takes to draw me in. I don't happen to see a chicken foot at all... It conveys interest juxtaposed with the Celtic circle. :) Have a great weekend, thanks for sharing!

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  53. Very striking. Even though I knew it was a caltrop, the first impression I had when the book flashed up on my screen was a beam of light coming from the center of the Celtic design. Never entered my mind "chicken foot". This will be the third time I'm going to read the Outlander Series. Starting this spring, hope to time finishing ABOSA when Echo comes out late this year.
    I said months ago I wished that the book would say "bestselling author of the Outlander Series" but I understand that ABOSA was the latest book to come out, it would be the freshest in peoples minds. It's just the whole series is a must to read. I'm sure I'll find things new that I missed the first and second time I read them. That's one of the things that make your books timeless.

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  54. First impression was WOW! The black is striking.
    After looking at it longer, I agree with Kristina that a dark blue would be better.
    Black is foreboding, though and perfect!

    I cannot wait to read this book!

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  55. It'll do just fine. I am more interested in what's *between* the covers, myself. :-)

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  56. Black background: ok

    Size/font/colouring of letters: ok

    Chicken foot: ?

    I know what a caltrop is, but wouldn't recognize it from an areal photograph. Also, it doesn't have an immediate bearing on the title, so is just confusing.

    At best, my reasoning (once someone pointed out that it WAS a caltrop) would be along the lines of "Barbed thingy atop a vaguely Celtic ring equals oppress Gaelic people and it will hurt you", but that people would actually bother to reason their way to that conclusion in the 0.5 seconds they will view the book (unless they know you already) is far-fetched in my opinion.

    LAZY.

    My 10 cents' worth,

    Iago

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  57. Dear Iago--

    It's a point. I'm more inclined to think people will look at it and say, "What?!?" Which is the first step to getting someone to pick up the book.

    See, we're dealing with a) people who already know the series and would--quite possibly [g]--buy the book if it was wrapped in brown paper, and b) people who _don't_ know it. Anything you can do to make that second group take a second look is a Good Thing.

    So here we have a dramatic-looking book, a vaguely Celtic element, and a wickedly pointy Thing. Say what? And that's good.

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  59. OK, forget I said chicken foot - I actually DO see a peace sign now, and all the other symbolic variations. It's actually quite brilliant, clearly people take from it what they want to see - it can represent any number of things.

    You're awesome Diana - thank you!

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  60. I'm excited! Looks great and I can't wait until it is in my hands!

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  61. Dear Diana:

    No mincing words -- this is one hot, kick-@$$ cover. Walking into a bookstore and seeing this in a display, I would find myself mesmerized and incapable of passing it by. Kudos to the Art Department.

    Midge

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  62. Dear Nathalie--

    Well, the only part of this I could take credit for is for saying I wanted a caltrop on the cover. [g] The dramatic execution and subtlety of the design is all due to the talents of the Random House Art Department.

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  63. Diana - I just meant you're awesome all-around :)

    But yes, the Random House Art Department is awesome too, they always do a fantastic job!

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  64. LOVE it! I've gotten quite a few friends hooked on this series and they are all FINALLY understanding my unending passion for your writing! Some of them are on Outlander, one is just starting Drums of Autumn, and another has only about 150 pages of A Breath of Snow and Ashes left. They all see now why I'm DYING for Echo to come out! Thank you for EVERYTHING! This is a GREAT cover!

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  65. Really like it! Can't wait to read it!

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  66. I agree with Lambchop...covers are nice, but what matters to me is what's in between them!! For some reason, the title is usually the one to catch my eye, then the author's name (although I always give new authors a chance of course), and after that, the synopsis in the back.

    Well, I really can't wait 'til ECHO is released. I began the Outlander series a couple of months ago...I'm near the end of Drums of Autumn now. Outlander has definitely surpassed even my Harry Potter obsession (and that's saying a lot) :)

    More people really should read about Jamie and Claire!! They're so real...I don't know how you came up with them. Were they based on people in your life (sorry if this has been asked a billion times)? Also, in terms of characters and character development, what would be your advice to an aspiring writer?

    :)

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  67. Dear SG--

    Yes, it has, and no, they aren't. [smile]

    Advice:

    1. Read

    2. Write

    3. Don't Stop!

    (Sorry to be so brief--I'm just rushing out to an appointment.)

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  68. I must say, it is understated and stunning! It6 does draw you in. That caltrop, though I don't know what it was used for, seems like it wasn't much fun if you were on the receiving end. I'm going to have to google it.

    I have read your books, as they have come out over the years, since I was 17. So this series has been in the background of my entire adult life. I absolutely love them! Although, I'm afraid that Jamie sets the bar a bit high for all of manhood *snicker*. I am so in love with your books, I run an online group about them, our active goal to recruit new readers and introduce them to the joys of Outlander.

    Thank you so much for providing me with substantial, intelligently written books that could reintroduce me to my love of reading! And with a strong and outspoken heroin to look up to and aspire to. Your books have shaped me in many ways. Thank you!

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  69. The black is nice! That caltrop thing with it's tetrahedron shape reminds me of molecular models in organic chemistry.
    Can't wait to get my hands on Echo.
    Carol

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  70. I didn't realize that they have unearthed caltrops at Jamestown...

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  71. WOW, now that i read that last comment it occurs to me that ive been reading those books since i was 18 (i ripped through outlander in 3 days)
    thats my whole adult life too(im 31 now)...whoa(my mind is blown).

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  72. Nightsmusic:

    The one on display in the visitor's center at Jamestown, VA, is supposedly the ONLY caltrop ever found in North America. Or so I was told when I visited there in September of last year. It really is in remarkably good condition for an artifact that's 400 years old.

    Karen

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  73. Karen, all I saw was the picture which is featured in the New Discoveries at Jamestown which you can download from Gutenberg.org. And yes, if the picture is even close, it almost looks new!

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  74. Amazing - and thank you for bringing us more of this wonderful series. I am going back through the entire series chapter by chapter - very slowly - so that I can catch everything that I am sure to have missed my first time through.

    We are also forming a book club to discuss! I cannot wait - thanks again for giving us something to look forward too. Especially during what everyone says will be a difficult year!

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  75. I love it! Very striking cover; emits tension. The colors seem
    to be black and gold which are
    the colors of the Super Bowl winners of last week and my team, it seems apropo, although I'm sure not intentional. Thank you, DG, for
    sharing!

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  76. Very nice cover art, as always ;) Looking forward for the German version; is Barbara Schnell again translating "simultaneously", so the German version will be available as soon as the English one? Reading "The fiery cross" in English gave my dictionnary a really hard time, as I remembered today when reading about the caltrop:
    I never heard "caltrop" before, and as I asked Leo.org to translate it into German, it said "Krähenfuß" - in the true sense of the meaning "crow foot", and for a moment I wondered if Young Ian gets a new pet in ECHO (poor Rollo).
    Then the German word is often used to describe little wrinkles around the eyes, too - so the next moment I tried to imagine how Claire would feel with such massive wrinkles in her face as shown on the cover.
    Then I gave up and googled the German word to find out that the "Krähenfuß" is also a very old weapon used for defense, and I decided that this must be the right translation. For Claires and Rollos sake *g*.
    Thank you for posting the cover, and thank you for making me learn something new again today *g*
    Kind regards from Germany :)

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  77. Hello Diana; I am so happy as you answered me; THANK YOU VERY MUCH: the coverage of your book is Very well Big kisses of France Christine

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  78. Love it - would love it even more in my hands. Love the celtic knot circle - it looks like the celtic design on my wedding band. And, after seeing the cover, I am a little nervous about what's in the book!

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  79. I like the new cover but am surprised that it is black. I guess that is fitting as this is the last book in the series?

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  80. Very Nice, Diana. It very much compliments the other series covers.
    AngieLass

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  81. Dear Diana

    That's OK, thanks for answering though! It's too bad your characters aren't based on actual people. It must mean there will never be a Jamie Fraser in real life :(

    Like what Heather said, Jamie does set the standards high for the male species :) LOL.

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  82. This is for MARY ANN: As I understand in previous comments from D.G., Echo is not the last book in the series. If I read the post correctly, there will be at least one more book after Echo.

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  83. The cover is great, but I wouldn't care what it looked like! I won't judge the book by its cover. LOL Like most of your fans, I would be delighted to read it with NO cover whatsoever. In other words, tell them to quit fussing around and print it!!

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  84. Would "love it" be too strong??
    It is very striking and does fit with the others.

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  85. That is a striking cover. I like the black background. Wow. I can't wait to read this one!

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  86. Oh, I love it! It is dark, and leaves a sense of mystery. It makes me eager to open and read why..... Can't wait to have one in my hands!

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  87. So Diana is there a release date yet for the book?

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  88. I am SO excited to add `Echo' to my collection. I have all the versions that have been printed (except for the paperbacks - lent them out & never got them back...).

    I think the new, black cover is stunning!

    As the Outlander series is my favorite story EVER, I have recommended and talked about the books for years. My mom, who has bad eyes and only has the patience to read magazine articles, has never read them, but has heard LOTS (repeatedly) about them. Of course, as a staunch Catholic who could never talk about S-E-X to me, I of course never brought up the fact that there is lots of S-E-X in the story with her.

    So she quite happily for a number of years, regularly promoted the Outlander series at the elementary school she teaches at (in a very small town). Well, finally as she was launching on again in the staff room about how her daughter SOOOO loves these books, and can never seem to put them down, one of the other teachers took her aside to inform her that - Oh My God! There is alot of S-E-X (whispered of course) in these much loved books of mine.

    Of course my mom was horrified and proceeded to inform me the next time we got together about her discovery. Consoling her with the fact that it was beautiful, MARRIED S-E-X didn't appease her much either. Apparently she still must hope that my 2 children were delivered by the stork - like i was!

    Still makes me laugh!

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  89. I gotta tell you, im still absolutely stoked there is more to the story!!!
    yay!!
    God i miss Jamie!!!

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  90. It's Gorgeous! I can hardly wait!

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  91. Dear Heather--

    OUTLANDER commandos? I love it! [g]

    As my first beloved editor said to me, "These _have_ to be word-of-mouth books, because they're too weird to describe to anyone!"

    This is absolutely true, so I _really_ appreciate folks like you, who take the time to spread the word!

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  92. Dear Nicole--

    Yes, Barbara is translating away, even as we speak. [g]

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  93. Dear Mary Ann--

    No, it isn't the last book--there's one more to follow AN ECHO IN THE BONE.

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  94. Dear Clefevre--

    Well, they can't print it until I finish _writing_ it, I'm afraid.

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  95. Dear Rob, Tina, et al--

    No, just "fall," so far. When I have a specific date, I'll post it, both here and on the website.

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  96. I LOVE it! This is the first book in the series that I've had to wait for & I'm so excited. I remember turning to my DH, at 12am on New Years Day, saying "Echo In The Bone comes out this year".

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  97. Dear Diana--

    I'm aware that mine is only one person's view, and as such nothing to pay attention to, statistically speaking. I just thought you might appreciate someone NOT saying goshwowI'mahugefanwhen'sitout for once.

    See, I DO have the distinction of being a non-fan (g), and as such I represent group two, the group of potential readers who - again only in my opinion - won't be buying this book, judging by its cover.

    My main objection is actually that I don't see that it is a caltrop immediately. Viewed slightly from the side and from above, with maybe a hint of paving surrounding the ring to indicate the ground on which the evil little bugger is placed, I WOULD have been interested, but, again, it's just my ten cents' worth.

    Iago

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  98. Dear Iago--

    Oh, I'm always interested in the minority report, you might say. [g]

    I agree that it would be good if it were possible to achieve a more 3-D effect--though having combed the internet for images for the art people to work from, I'm aware that this is easier said than done, and they've done a really good job in getting it to look this way (the "chicken foot" minority report notwithstanding--and they also have a point [g]).

    Still, I also know from informal polling here and there than most folk wouldn't recognize a caltrop as such, no matter how it was depicted; only people with a more than casual interest in military history (or who live where the weed called "caltrop" grows) are likely to know the word, let alone connect it to its use.

    That being so--does it matter whether the casual browser stops because they say, "Aha! A caltrop! What does _that_ have to do with this story?" or because they say, "Whoa--what's _that_ wicked-looking thing?" From my point of view, probably not. From yours, maybe so. [g]

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  99. Dear Iago--

    Oh--when you say you're a "non-fan," do you mean that you don't/haven't read the books, or that you have but don't care for them?

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  100. The cover art is lovely!
    Also happy to hear, that B.Schnell is "translating away" Sending lots of good work vibrations your way.
    Is the German Echo going to be a black background too? Just wondering, since ABOSAa has been in this colour. Being able to choose, I will buy the British version. (Blue is my fav. colour)
    Supposing, both versions are identical in content. *g*

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  101. Dear Birgit--

    Yes, the contents will be identical, for the UK and UK versions. I have _no_ idea what the German cover will look like, though.

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  102. I've got shivery goosebumps just looking at the cover. Fantastic!

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  103. The cover looks very striking. Now I can't WAIT to hold the book in my hands!!!

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  104. Dear Diana--

    I'm a "non-fan" in the sense that I have read your books (the first two in the Outlander series), and wasn't blown away by them.

    The concept I (kinda) like, but the realisation that I was going to have to read umpteen books to find out what happens was enough to put me off.

    To me the process of bringing a book into this world - all aspects of it, writing AND publishing - is interesting, hence my previous comments.

    Having said all this, I find you to be remarkably open about what you do, and I admire you for that. If I have over-stepped my mark here, do feel free to have a go at my writing...! Quid pro quo, doncher know.(g)

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  105. Dear Diana--

    Oh, one more thing... (g) The dumbing down of today's society is beyond belief, really! Imagine not knowing what a caltrop is.

    In my neck of the woods they are known as "Spanish knights", which I find to be a lovely slur, and obviously a linguistic forerunner to its decendant, the contemporary PG-13 version, the "lazy Policeman". Your people call it a speed bump, I think.

    As far as the chicken foot theory is concerned I think you are well adviced to heed THAT minority report. Clearly it would be Bad Mojo to do otherwise... (g)

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  106. Interesting comments, and voluminous, considering the post just went up two days ago! I first read Outlander in 1991 (found it in the library of the old Mather AFB during lunch one day), and was hooked instantly! However, I take issue with the connection that not knowing what a caltrop is has anything to do with the dumbing down of our culture (not saying I disagree that said dumbing down is a reality). I love to read and learn, and I had no idea what it was - it's not in my Merriam-Webster dictionary (2004), so I had to go to my grandfather's dictionary - Webster's 20th Century Dictionary Unabridged (1942)- to find the definition to discover it is not only an obsolete weapon used in the days of cavalry (although I daresay we have similar explosive ones now for use against armored vehicles), but also a term used in botany for such annoying plants as star thistle Oh, and can be spelled caltrap as well - and is not in the current lexicon, since I keep getting that annoying red line under it whilst typing.

    Oh yeah, like the cover but prefer the UK version...matter of taste! And someone mentioned black diamond - isn't that an adamant?

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  107. Dear Diana,

    I've been reading the comments made on this site for a bit and decided to get in on the fun!

    Like a previous poster I realized I'd been reading these books for my entire adult life too (started at 18 and still going at 31). In fact, being the naive young student that I was, I sent a gushing email while in University that you were kind enough to reply back to. I believe I was writing a paper on the '45 at the time...

    Anyway. Intro over, gushing aside, my first impression of the cover was that it was quite striking. The black background combined with the golden letters and picture made it really "pop". That said, I didn't see 'Caltrop'. Of course, I didn't see 'chicken foot' until it was mentioned and now I can't get it out of my head! Actually, what I saw was a celtic brooch. Perhaps if the caltrop was shown from a slightly different angle I would "see" it. Also missed the bit about it being wickedly sharp until I looked closer. Either way, I'll be buying the book anyway.

    So there you go - my two cents.

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  108. Iago: Just curious! How did you find your way to this blog site? Reading your comments, I assume you are not a big fan of the Outlander Novels (having no desire to read anymore then the first few books}. I know the blog can be a love fest at times, and there will always be different opinions. I just wondered why you bothered with it.
    I had to look up the word caltrop. It isn't a common word used in this day and age, but it would be appropriate for the books time period. I don't necessarily think because we don't use words of a different era that it is "dumbing down". We are such a diverse country that language will always be evolving (good and
    bad).

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  109. Sharaf: I had it pointed out to me by a fan, and I bother for the reasons stated above, namely that I am interested in books in general, and thought a more objective view would be of interest.

    Not saying fans aren't entitled to gush, mind you, just that if I were an author I'd probably be more interested in catching the attention of those who aren't hooked already.

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  110. Iago: Thank you for responding to my comment. I'm sure DG has heard and read it all. Criticism can run from good, bad, and down right snippy.
    I realize her writing is not for everyone (I can't stand Vampire novels of any kind no matter how well written). I just think she is one of the best at what she does.
    I also think she has stayed true to her belief in her writing. She has let the masses come to her instead of trying to write for the masses. I hope that makes sense.

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  111. It is slightly mind boggling to me how different a feeling this cover evokes when compared to the UK cover. I adore them both--thought the skeleton leaf was brilliant, but possibly too peaceful, and I squealed in delight at the sight of the caltrop, which I recognized immediately, but only because they were mentioned last year in a history class I took.

    That said, I was thinking back to the images you gave us when caltrops were first mentioned as the shape of the book. Perhaps people would stop thinking of "chicken foot" if the image was more like the fancy twisted wire one you showed us. I thought that one had symbolic possibilities (multiple stories all twisted together in a central "glue" character).

    Thanks for sharing!
    Eleanor

    P.S. I suppose I could technically add my voice to those who've been reading your books all their adult lives, but it seems like I don't really count yet in that respect, seeing as that's only six years!

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  112. Dear Diana,
    Kudos to the art department to be able to condense an entire novel into three elements: black background, celtic circle and a caltrop. By the strength and simplicity of the imagery, I can only imagine how the story unfolds. I am so looking forward to reading the next installment of the Jamie-Claire saga.

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  113. Wow! It looks great! I seriously can not wait. I just finished rereading the whole series for the 4th time today and am going through withdraw! :)

    http://sprucehill.typepad.com/
    My day to day life while kicking cancer's butt

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  114. Well, it has the most essential element:

    ... DIANA GABALDON ...

    I will not look any further! It will be in my hand and at the checkout in record speed.

    As far as covers go, however, I would pick the UK cover if I could choose between the two. The most eye catching element on the US cover is the celtic design, which certainly does catch my attention. The caltrop doesn't speak to me but the celtic circle does in volumes! So, something for everyone?!?!

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  115. Diana, the cover is beautiful. I can't wait to read what's behind it :)

    I'm sitting here in Flagstaff, watching it snow! It's been coming down all day, and apparently it will be tonight, too! My 10 year old daughter is crossing her fingers for a snow day tomorrow.

    I might have to re-read ABOSAA to get me through the storm :)

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  116. oh I am so exicted! just seeing that picture made my heart start to race at the reality that this book is coming!! ok, so Im a bit of a Jamie Fraser junkie who needs a fix. Nothing wrong with that right? :)

    the cover looks incredible. It will perfect in my hands!

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  117. I would indeed read the new book if it was wrapped in a brown paper bag, but I do prefer the UK cover better. My first thought was "chicken foot" too, so I was glad someone else posted before I did. Love the black and the Celtic circle, wish they would of went with silver though.

    I can't believe it's getting so close to the next book!

    Woo Hooooooooooooo!

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  118. Chicken toes are pointed somewhat in one direction except the back one is pointed.. well backwards. So I don't see the chicken thing. Here's a link that shows a rooster and his feet:
    http://www.chickenauctions.com/cgi-bin/auction/auction.cgi?category=23914&item=1234228226

    Actually, before I enlarged the pic and realized it was a caltrop I thought it was a stylized ginseng root!

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  119. The way the caltrop and the circle are positioned reminds me of looking through a sight...like taking aim at something...
    ...but what?
    Waiting to find out....
    Just curious...do the people in the art dept. read parts of the manuscript before coming up with a cover design?

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  120. Dear Pamela--

    Oddly enough [g], I'm also in Flagstaff, watching the snow. En route to Santa Fe tomorrow, always assuming the roads are passable--but I think they will be. It's not one of those Big Snows, where it comes down without stopping for two or three days; just repeated small storms.

    Really beautiful--did you see the orange sky earlier tonight? There was a light fog over the Rim as we came up around twilight; it was like being inside a black pearl.

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  121. Dear Athena--

    Generally speaking, no; but on the other hand, I've been with Random House for nearly twenty years now, and I suppose it's possible that some of the art people may have read one or more of the books.

    They haven't read ECHO, though, because I haven't finished writing it!

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  122. Dear Iago--

    Oh, an immediate gratification junkie, eh? [g] That's OK; once I finish the series, I'll do a second volume of the COMPANION, which will include detailed synopses of the second four books (THE OUTLANDISH COMPANION has such synopses for the first four) and you can find out what-all happened without the labor of reading several million words.

    Still, given your history with the books, and knowing that this is the seventh in the series, you wouldn't be likely to read ECHO, no matter what the cover looked like, would you?

    (Not saying that your opinion is irrelevant, by any means--just that you aren't in either the buy-on-sight or the never-heard-of-this-person-but-it-looks-intriguing group.)

    I believe those things are called "sleeping policement" in the UK. [g]

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  123. I love the black !!! - but then I'm one of those freaks who wears black for now (till they find something darker) *g*

    Waiting with baited breath till it's in my hot little hands.

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  124. Well, I love it. Makes me wonder, since black has such a final quality to it... will the next one be white?

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  125. I think the black will stand out nicely next to the rest of the set. I don't think it looks like a chicken foot. And I agree that the gushing fans of the books have grown word of mouth just as predicted. I know I've told everyone I meet about the series, even loaned a woman in a dental office my spare copy I keep to read when Im stuck too long in a office! Never hurts to be prepared with gum, snack and a good book!

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  126. Diana,

    im loving your ability to smartly (and politely) zing criticizers.
    *HG*

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  127. Rachel,
    I must wade back in here as one of the chicken-foot people. I imagine the point of Diana's posting the cover here is to elicit feedback so that when the book launches the NY Times and others do not find some problem. A second reason is likely to keep us all engaged, and she is succeeding.

    I've been involved in developing and deploying customer software for 20 years. If I am very lucky, I have beta testers who tell me what they really think and point out potential problems.

    I love the books, I have read the entire series once and listened to them in audio form three times. I can't wait to get the next one and will also buy the graphic novel. I am a true fan and because I am, I want Echo to succeed wildly.

    So don't take the comments of those of us who are critical as negativity. We are being good beta testers and pointing out the potential issues as we see them. You may not see the same problems and that is a totally valid position.

    Best
    Leslie

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  128. my comment was about one commentor in particular (who shall remain nameless cuz im not gonna be that way)
    :} thanks for the zing.
    high fives! (and im not being a smartypants when i say that, i really mean it) *G*

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  129. I like the new cover a lot and can not wait for it to come out in stores. I have started to re-read the complete series again as it has been some years ago that I read them the first time. I am currently just about done with Dragon fly in Amber. I just love Clair and Jamie..

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  130. Ya know, I think I'll like it even more when I'm holding it in my hands...

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  131. I like the cover a lot.
    I find the image striking with the black background...though I think someone already said that in the comments [g]. I'd buy the book either way, since I've already read most of them (I'm just starting The Fiery Cross), but I emailed a link to the cover to my friend, and she said that the cover interested her, and she would definitely pick it up to see what it was about. I, as a fan, like how the covers of all of the books keep a similar aspect with the "one-color" background and then the shape in the middle.

    How is the book coming along so far? Is it going to be around the same length as the previous two?

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  132. Oh,gosh, Diana I hope you are safe! It looks just awful out there. Flag did cancel school...my hubby made it in to work OK, though.

    We're down in Kachina Village, and we seem to get more snow here than town does. :: shrug ::

    Drive careful on your way to Santa Fe!

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  133. Dear Diana,

    Thank you for your kind answer. I guess we kind of are OUTLANDER commandos! [g]

    We have actually had a lot of success with Twilighters!! They seem keen to keep reading after that series, and are easily turned on to Outlander! The talk in their groups are turning more and more Outlandish with all their referances to Outlander! [g] We have turned a good many of them. Anyways, we are keeping up the fight,if for no other reason, than to get more books sold and compell you to keep our beloved charactures adventures going with more books! Thank you!!

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  134. Diana:)

    Thank you so much for all you do. I am one of those sad (or lucky) individuals who get totally lost in books. So it is no surprise that your books have been a major influence in my life for the past well forever! Since 1991 I have gone back to school and now teach American History to 9th and 10th graders. I make it my mission to use historical fiction as much as possible in the classroom.

    I love the books, I love the new cover and I look forward to the adventure that awaits Claire and Jamie. Is there anyway we can meet Ben Franklin???

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  135. Well, I learned something new today! I now know what a caltrop is and I can see it when the image is enlarged. The cover certainly is striking but I found the blue cover just as eye-catching. I'll be interested to see which cover art is offered to us Aussies. I'm itching to have Echo in my hot little hands!

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  136. Dear Rachel--

    I don't actually object to criticism at all; I really did post the cover art to see what folk think of it (though I'm certainly glad that y'all by and large do like it).

    Always fun to joust with an intelligent comrade, though. [g]

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  137. Dear Leslie--

    Believe me, if people in general think it's a chicken-foot, I certainly want to know that. [g]

    Though I passed on the link for this discussion to both my editor and agent, and the agent replied, "Even if it looks like a chicken foot to some people, it's a _scary_ chicken foot, and that will intrigue."

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  138. Dear Pamela--

    It looked nasty this morning, but we left Flag early, and fifteen miles east of town...poof! No more snow.

    Totally clear roads all the way to Santa Fe; just clouds on the horizon. Mind, I imagine all that stuff will catch up with us here in the next day or two, but we did make it safely, thanks for asking!

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  139. Dear Heather G--

    Yes, I'm thrilled that Harry Potter and the Twilight books are so popular--not only am I all for kids reading (anything [g])--these are _my_ potential fans!

    All good word-of-mouth MUCH appreciated--thank you!

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  140. Dear Diana--

    Indeed, I believe you're right. They're sleeping in the UK, but lazy where I'm from. Guess that makes them slightly more dangerous, and me a tad less easy to place, eh? (g)

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  141. I have just read all 148 comments, in addition to your post, and it is amazing what an intelligent group of people are gathered here! You are right, Diana, most of us would read the book if the jacket was plain brown paper. Can't wait! :)

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  142. Finally...someone who is not a raving brown-noser. Diana, you totally deserve every wonderful thing people say about you, but I swear, some of these super-fans would buy your toenail clippings if you put them up for sale. Iago, give the rest of the series a chance already. It's unfair to criticize when you are not fully "informed."

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  143. Oh be still my heart!

    I have a running list of blogs I check on weekly basis or so (for work and personal reasons) and I'm always excited to reach this one, but I sure as heck wasn't prepared to see the cover of the next book! *squeals in an only-dog-hearing decibel* I LOVE IT! I'm 50 times more excited about it coming out than I was five minutes ago. WHOHOO!

    I think the black spine will look excellent next to the silver of ABOSAA and go along well with the rest of the color scheme. ;)

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  144. Beautiful! I love the black...seems to me I recommended that color! Great!

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  145. Love it but honestly it could come wrapped in saran wrap and I would be happy. Can't wait to get my hands on the book and ignore my hubby (his perception not mine) for a week or so.

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  146. Love it but quite honestly it could come wrapped in saran wrap and I would be happy. Can't wait to get the book in my hands so that I can ignore my hubby (his perception not mine!!) for a week or so.

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  147. Dear Emilia--

    Well, Iago says he's read two of the books; that's probably enough for him to conclude that they aren't the sort of reading experience he really prefers. I run into a lot of people who are intimidated or overwhelmed at the thought of enormous books (not saying that's Iago's response, as he did read the first two)--but they also often say that they prefer a story they can read quickly and all at once.

    These _are_ big, complex books, with all kinds of multiplex layers and ends-sticking-out. [g] Not everybody wants to stay mentally or emotionally involved in a book or books for days/weeks/months, and that's a totally reasonable response.

    Luckily for me, a lot of other folk -do-. [g]

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  148. I guess I have to weigh in on the chicken foot comments, LOL.

    I personally don't think it *looks* like a chicken foot, but can see how people may be reminded, perhaps, of a rooster's spur (a formidable weapon itself, haha).

    I guess I think it looks like a thorn or bramble. I had never heard of a caltrop until I read these posts (sorry, Iago, LOL!) even though I'm educated and read all the time...I don't think anything needs to be "dumbed down" for me. I know how to use a dictionary, after all!

    Diana, glad you made it safe to Santa Fe...the storm went crazy here. My husband's pick up is a vaguely truck-shaped, white hump in the driveway! Most snow I've ever seen at once since moving to Flag 5 years ago :)

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  149. Love it! I had no clue what a caltrop was (with the exception of your mention previously in the UK cover discussion)

    As for me, I had once-and-done books, big, complicated, series tomes are my cup of tea (or coffe, as the case may be).

    I just can't wait! Maybe it'll be out in time for my birthday! (Oct 15th)

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  150. I don't comment here often but thought I'd give my two cents on the cover. I liked the blue but the darker background does give more of an ominous feel. As for the caltrop, I hadn't thought chicken foot until I read the comments but now that I look back, I can see it. But since you've touched on all sorts of magic in this series, is a chicken foot really out of place? I don't think so! :-)

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  151. Diana -

    Ha, a scary chicken foot! I suppose it could be quite an evil looking foot, at that...

    My my, I certainly sparked an interesting debate with that one little chicken foot comment...glad I could get it going :)

    Nonetheless, I still think it's perfect - chicken foot perception or not.

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  152. Dear Diana and Sharaf--

    nowhere near the Iberian peninsula, I'm afraid. Would have been nice, though, since sleet is severing my magnolia buds even as I write...

    As for not wanting to invest in long, complex stories, I love to. I just didn't feel that there was anything much in the first two books indicating that I would be "properly" rewarded in the end, i.e. given an explanation that I could suspend my disbelief in, and so I decided to quit.

    Incidentally, this is a lot more than I was prepared to invest in Harry Potter, for instance, where I decided life was just too short to even bother finishing the first book. (g)

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  153. Dear Iago--

    Magnolia buds and Spanish knights, hm? Florida?

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  154. First things first - I like the cover for the most part, especially the celtic circle. I'd have prefered a different color than black, but since I'll be reading the book anyway, it doesn't really matter to me.

    And WOW - there's another Katrina here with an October birthday? Mine's the 6th. If Echo doesn't make it in time for that, I guess I may just have to wait until Christmas. Just to clarify though, I've posted here before (not sure if the other Katrina has).

    Regards,
    Katrina K. (Arkansas)

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  155. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  156. Its quite a nice cover. The delicate look of the scroll circle plays off well with the striking caltrop over it. But to tell the truth it could have been puce with an image of that horrific white sow on it and I would still be counting the days until I get it.

    Has anyone noticed the Amizon is taking pre-orders?

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  157. Hmmm,
    I grew up in Fl and sleet is pretty rare even in the north, perhaps GA or the Carolina's? Altho noone can pretend that the weather hasn't been weird lately.

    PS: To Karen's post of 2/7. Be careful as to the superbowl references, remember, Diana is from Arizona!

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  158. I have to say Diana, I love this cover! It's a 'wow' cover.


    I was reading Drums for the sixth time and just realized that you referenced an 'echo in the bone' and a 'caltrop' in there. I know, not connected, but it took my sixth reading to spot that!

    I hope they don't change a thing with this cover. Now, to get it into my hands. *rubbing hands in demented villain style*

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  159. Duh,

    Silly us, I clicked on Iago's name and got his profile, he's from Belgium of all places. I'didn't know they had magnolias there.

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  160. Dee,

    You beat me to it (or at least posting about it)! Didn't realize magnolias grew above the 35th parallel, but apparently via hybridization, they can grow throughout Europe now (Brussels is in the 50th parallel).

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  161. Evocative! Perfect on every level!

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  162. Aarrgggh.. Tantelising.....all I need now is the words within the cover. Roll on October(ish) CAN'T WAIT!!

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  163. Dear Diana and Dee--

    you're getting colder (and this has nothing to do with global climate patterns!). If the eyes led you south, think again...

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  164. Oh, and Bethane has pinpointed my location, of course, but that has precious little to do with where I'm from...!

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  165. Diana: You are the featured author in today's Mallard Fillmore cartoon by Bruce Tinsley. Check it out. I'm sure Tinsley will be inundated with replies from your readers.

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  166. Seriouly Iago, you are losing my interest fast. What's the big deal about where you are and where you're from. We are all in cyber-space anyway. I would be more interested in what books over two hundred pages could hold you attention. Since you have made it plain DG's novels and the even lower Harry Potter books dont't do it, what does? Come on put yourself out there. Maybe Diana can use something you like in her next chapter. I know! How about a 22 year old guy named Iago who is transported back to the time of the Revolutionary War and Claire and Jamie have to teach him how to live without his computer, cell phone, I-pod, X-box, his Wii and the all important "flat screen TV with HDTV". Oh! and his 21st century opinions.

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  167. Oh! Iago you might just fit in any way since you knew what a "Caltrop" was. Man am I cranky this morning. Sorry everyone!

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  168. To the other Katrina! I didn't know there were 2 either. I've posted before, but not often. I'm Katrina S. for clarity and I'm in SC. We did, actually, have some winter weather a couple weeks ago, but we are back in "mild" weather again - mid 60's to 70's. go figure.
    I agree, were it puce and had the wicked sow, I'm sure I'd purchase anyway, as I'd read it anyway. Although I must say, when picking a new book I do often judge by the cover. If it is too boring looking, I often don't even read the liner notes (which are also incredibly important).

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  169. Well, Sharaf,

    I must look a lot younger in the cold light of the 'puter screen than I normally do, that's all I'm saying! (g)

    Oh, and Claire and Jamie would have an easy job of it, since I only own two of the things you mentioned, nammely a computer and a cell phone, both old enough to be hand-cranked, or just about...

    Of course it doesn't matter where I'm from - it was just a ripost to Diana's UK lunge, as it were. You may think of me as the illiterate fool of the global village henceforth. (s)

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  170. I don't really like the cover that much. I like the black - though black's never bad to me - but I actually don't like the style of the text.
    The caltrop's okay but now, because of the comments, I can't get the "chickenfoot" thing out of my head and eyes.



    Oh oh, and can I guess too?
    Im guessing Iago's from Sweden by the looks of what blogs he's following.

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  171. Well Iago, I was trying to push your buttons to see what happened. But you managed to side step my questions anyway. So like I said earlier, I've now lost interest. Anyway! off to start reading the Outlander Series in anticipation of Echo later this year.

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  172. je suis française et j'adore vos livres . Juste une question : when do you publish the last book " le chardon et le tartan" : j'ai tout lu même son of liberty . J'attends avec impatience la fin de cette saga passionnante . Please, please, ne nous faites pas attendre trop longtemps .
    A French who don't speak well english but a french who is ready to read in english the lastest book .
    Thank you for your book and your imagination.

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  173. Je suis française et j'adore vos livres : quand allez-vous publier le dernier livre de la série "le chardon et le tartan" . Please, please, tell me how this story will finish .


    Congratulations for your books and your imagination .
    A French who don't speak english very well .

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  174. i like the colors a lot, and the overall design. very menacing indeed. though i will add to the others saying they thought it was chicken foot lol. i had no idea what a caltrop was so i had to look it up, but upon enlarging the image it looked less like a chicken foot and more like a weapon. :)

    i still think i'm partial to the UK cover design though

    ~Corinne

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  175. Katrina S. in SC, I'm in SC, too. Are you in the Upstate?
    -carol

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  176. Merci beaucoup, Christophe et Florence! [g]

    I'm writing as fast as I can!

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  177. Katrina S. -
    How funny, I was a Katrina S. myself until 10 years ago come March. Did you get part of that nasty winter/ice storm from 2 weeks back? It coated northern Arkansas (some people are STILL without power), but we here in the Little Rock area escaped unscathed.
    Regards,
    Katrina K.

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  178. I love it!! But I'm one of those that would buy the book no matter what it looks like.

    Iago: What type of books do you read?

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  179. It is totally a chicken foot to me. If there must be a caltrop, then I support the suggestion of the twisty caltrop as mentioned previously.
    I appreciate the opportunity to beta test the cover, thank you for sharing.

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  180. Just checked out Amazon, and they are indeed taking pre-orders - not only that, but they are listing an availability date of September 22, 2009. Do they know something you don't know, Diana? [evil grin]

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  181. Wow! :) As I read through the books, I find that the cover colours get more and more interesting - I'm now reading The Fiery Cross, a nice deep red. Then, I see on the bookshelf at the local bookstore that the next colour is *silver*, whoo-hoo! :)

    So! This next one is good - a very brooding and strong looking cover...and they just happen to be the colours of my Alma Mater, too - black and gold! ;)

    Looking forward to this newest release!

    Jennifer
    :)

    p.s. I followed your instructions and now we here in Halifax, Nova Scotia will cross our fingers that your publishers will choose our store for your visit! :)

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  182. Katrina K. - I haven't always been Katrina S. only for the last 3 years. was Katrina N. when I started reading Outlander! I actually picked up Drums first at a used book store and only realized, silly me, that it was 3rd in a series once I got it home! as for winter weather, only a very little bit, as I'm in the central/columbia area (which also nicely answers Rebel's question (g) ) only a two hour delay for work, no closings! what a bummer. I've a good friend in the Fayeteville, AR area, I think they got some bad weather.

    I do really see a chicken foot. . . and a peace sign. At least it keeps me guessing!

    and on a side note, I almost understood all the french! yay!
    -Katrina S.

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  183. Dear Karen--

    No, they don't. They just pull dates out of their collective rear end, and then blithely change them when they get a _real_ date from the publisher.

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  184. Dear Lily,

    well done. Spot on.

    Dear Jenntx74,

    it's a difficult question, that one, and one that always throws me, but I'd say well written books with a non-obvious, twisted plot always get me.

    Also, for the record, I love to follow characters and watch them develop over time, but I do want a book to have a complete story.

    Examples? Are you taking notes Sharaf? There'll be a short quiz afterwards: Chuck Palahniuk, Terry Pratchett, John Berendt, Alan Moore... (voice fading)

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  185. Hi Diana

    Thanks for your response - I already knew that, having been the victim of that particular trick of theirs in the past! Just being my usual evil self [g] which doesn't translate well in a blog post, unfortunately :)

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  186. Ok! One more time,Iago. Pop quiz? umh! Well I have read J. Berendt's Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil" and City of Falling Angels.  Loved them.  I tried watching the film V for Vendetta. No go on that one.  C. Palchniuk is too far out there for me.  Sorry have not read Teri Pratchett.  So I guess I flunked your test. It's scary that we have even one in common. Boy I thought all Swede's were fair haired and blue eyed.  Are you sure your ancestor's didn't drift up from Spain. Also wouldn't growing Magnolia's in Belgium be a pain in the butt. I feel like we hi-jacked Diana's blog. At least she has moved on.

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  187. Wow, this conversation has gotten quite heated over the past couple of days!

    I too, have been reading these books for a long time. I think I stared when I was 14 and have read through them numerous times. Claire and Jamie are like old friends to me.

    I've turned several people on to them and as my friend Jess said, when I drug her to Broders and forced her to buy at least the first 2, "These book are like heroin!"

    I also wanted to say that I love that Brianna and Roger's daughter is named 'Amanda'

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  188. I love it! It gave me chills when I first saw it, then I just stared at it for a few moments imagining what's inside...

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  190. Oh, I can't wait til I have it my hands! I just love your books (and have turned several friends into lovers of them, as well ;) )!

    It was nice to see that you also plan for an eighth book in the series. In due time. :D But first I'm eager to see this one under my reading lamp!

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